Today’s Solutions: May 27, 2022

Conservation

Nature relies on a rich diversity of organisms to keep it in balance. Conservation plays a key role in ensuring that environmental equilibrium is preserved. Learn about the solutions spearheading our efforts to promote biodiversity, safeguard vital ecosystems, and protect endangered species.

view of shark fin protruding out of the blue water against blue sky

Want to keep sharks and beachgoers safe? There’s an app for that

Sharks, as top predators, are a keystone species. This means the balance of whole marine ecosystems relies heavily on sharks' well-being. Protecting and conserving sharks is of the utmost importance, especially since they already face many threats to their survival such as the illegal shark fin Read More...

Two dolphins swimming underwater with sea surface in the background

Scientists discover prehistoric dolphin species in landlocked Switzerland

Paleontologists have recently made an extraordinary discovery in landlocked Switzerland: two new species of dolphin dating back to 20 million years ago. Ancient dolphin species  Located in the heart of Europe, Switzerland is entirely landlocked. Millions of years ago, however, the area used to Read More...

Plankton drifting in water.

Study reveals planktons' unexpected resilience to global warming

With our changing climate, protecting all impacted organisms on Earth is a huge priority. The planet has gone through previous cycles of heating and cooling, and looking at these periods can give us clues about what may happen. An international team of researchers has done just that, by studying Read More...

Brazilian Indigenous Peoples

Mining companies decide against mining Brazil’s Indigenous areas

An important part of the growing movement for the rights of nature is empowering indigenous peoples to steward their lands. Indigenous forests sequester twice as much carbon as those on private or public lands, and these often have the highest levels of biodiversity.  The trend now includes 130 Read More...

Belize Barrier Reef aerial view

How the Belize Barrier Reef is coming back to life

When Hurricane Iris hit Belize in 2001, it ravaged almost all of the country’s coral reefs. The devastation signaled bad news not only for the surrounding marine life but also for the local communities who rely on reefs for food, work, and protection from storms and erosion. Now, thanks to a Read More...

Redwoods

Redwoods grow new leaves to adapt to drought

We’re doing a lot to adapt to climate change, from creating tree cities and sponge cities to speeding up the schedule for renewable energy. As it turns out, though, humans aren’t the only ones getting ready and adapting to a changing climate.  California’s iconic redwoods have started Read More...

Aerial view on Cogilnic River river freed from the dams

Dam! Europe removes record number of river barriers in 2021

In 2021, Spain began a movement to remove dams from the country’s rivers to restore fish migration routes and boost biodiversity across the nation. They successfully took down 108 barriers and inspired other European countries to do the same. “Our efforts to expand dam removals across Europe Read More...

close up of bees on honeycombs

4 fascinating facts about bees to celebrate Bee Day

May 20th is Bee Day! So, to celebrate our fabulous pollinating friends, here are four facts that go beyond their all-important role in plant cross-fertilization. Females are the future Female bees have different jobs depending on the species, but in all communities, female bees play essential Read More...

Young mountain gorilla in a forest area.

Meet the animals that refused to go extinct

May 20th marks the 17th annual Endangered Species Day. Every year, thousands of people around the world join together in taking action to protect and celebrate endangered or threatened species. In solidarity with the lives of the wonderful creatures with whom we share Earth, The Optimist Daily Read More...

Tuna School

“Blue Corridors”: using science and animal instinct to save fish populations

We’ve all marveled at the intrepid salmon swimming against the current, up waterfalls, and avoiding predators to return to its native spawning grounds, or at least we’ve all seen it on a nature show. This behavior is called philopatry, an animal’s tendency to return to its area of birth, and Read More...